A 9.5 metre ‘spike’ wave, taken by Stuart Brown, which is created by combining more than 2,000 waves into a central focus and is analogous to a two-dimensional supernova, won first place in the equipment category

The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council is the main UK government agency for funding research and training in engineering and the physical sciences, investing more than £800 million a year in a broad range of subjects – from mathematics to materials science, and from information technology to structural engineering.

The EPSRC Photo Competition allows researchers and doctoral students to share their work in pictures, with winners from categories ranging from ‘eureka’ to ‘weird and wonderful’.

Here are some of the winners from the latest competition that is held every year to encourage interest and motivate more students to pursue studies in engineering and physical science.

A rotating jet of a viscoelastic liquid, which won first place in the weird and wonderful category. Photograph: Professor Omar Matar/EPSRC/PA

A mating pair of critically endangered Costa Rican lemur leaf frogs displaying the two colourations the frogs cycle between on a daily basis, which won third place in the eureka category and overall. Photograph: Chris Blount/EPSRC/PA

An iCub robot learning how to play from a child, winner of the people category. Photograph: Dr Patricia Shaw/EPSRC/PA

Fluid streams from an oscillating microbubble, which took second place in the innovation category. Photograph: Dr Dario Carugo/EPSRC/PA

Workers in a London underground tunnel, second place in the people category. Photograph: Akos Revesz/EPSRC/PA

Developing brain cells, second place in the eureka category. Photograph: George Joseph/EPSRC/PA

Children welcoming earthquake engineering researchers to Lapsibot in Nepal, third place in the people category. Photograph: Dr Sean Wilkinson/EPSRC/PA

A laser image of 1m degree celsius plasma column, which took third place in the innovation category. Photograph: Jack Hare/EPSRC/PA

A micro-metal flower; third place in the weird and wonderful category Photograph: Dr Dhayalan Shakthivel/EPSRC/PA

A microwave ion-trap chip for quantum computation, winner of the eureka category and overall winner. Photograph: Diana Prado Lopes Aude Craik/EPS/PA

Dark field light microscopy picture of a 40nm thick electrodeposited TiO2 layer, focusing on developing sustainable fuels, such as hydrogen, through water splitting reactions. The picture came second in the equipment category. Photograph: Katarzyna Sokol/EPSRC/PA

Sub-micron particles on the surface of a human tooth, which took second place in the weird and wonderful category. Photograph: Nina Vyas/EPSRC/PA

Light-matter interaction using a high-finesse optical ring cavity and cold atoms, which took third place in the equipment category. Photograph: Andreas Lampis/EPSRC/PA

Engineering PhD student Karen Yu working on the ultra-precise ultrafast laser system, winner of the innovation category. Photograph: Jonathon Parkins/EPSRC/PA

 

 

 

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